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Month: February 2020

Willow CTF — Write-up

Willow CTF — Write-up

TryHackMe Challenge Link: https://tryhackme.com/room/willow Willow is the third box I’ve written, but the second to be publicly released. The first two — Jack-Of-All-Trades and Year of the Rabbit — were both designed for specific events, but they will hopefully be released on TryHackMe in due course. This particular box was designed when I was in a very specific frame of mind, which is reflected in the slightly ethereal nature of the theme. Brownie points if anyone can identify where the…

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Note Taking and Write-ups

Note Taking and Write-ups

Introduction: This is just going to be a quick post detailing my personal preferences for documentation in the hope that it may help a few people get started with write-ups, and perhaps introduce you to some great software! We’ll start by looking at a couple of pieces of software (Cherrytree and Flameshot) which, frankly, I couldn’t recommend more; then briefly discuss a few tips for writeups and documentation as a whole. Let’s start with the software. Software: Cherrytree Cherrytree is…

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CherryBlossom CTF — Write-up

CherryBlossom CTF — Write-up

TryHackMe Challenge Link: https://tryhackme.com/room/cherryblossom CherryBlossom is my fourth CTF Challenge Box. It focuses heavily on cryptography and file manipulation, but also contains lateral movement and a privesc once the machine itself is compromised. Let’s begin. Initial Enumeration: We start, as always, with an nmap scan to see what services we have available to us: Three open ports, all standard. We have SSH running on Port 22 — there’s nothing we can do with this for now; not without at least…

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Daily Bugle — Write-up

Daily Bugle — Write-up

Challenge Link: https://tryhackme.com/room/dailybugle Daily Bugle is a Spiderman themed box on TryHackMe. It requires some knowledge of SQLi, basic enumeration, password cracking and privilege escalation. This box is rated hard — primarily due to the relative inconsistency of the SQL injection required to get initial access. Let’s begin. Initial Enumeration: As per usual, we’re going to start with a quick nmap scan of this box. Use the following command to see what we’ve got available to us: Great — we…

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